"Made in Sheffield" 1830-1930, A golden age ?

Jack Black

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Dec 2, 2005
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...Because even the largest Sheffield cutlery firms relied on outworkers for much of their production, you will often see identical patterns with different manufacturers names on the tangs...

Here's an example of this, a smaller MOP Lobster, with Victorian Rodgers tang stamps on the blades, and a Wostenholm stamp on the Sheffield-pattern nail-file :thumbsup:

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Yes, thank you. I was so excited to find an Ibberson in any condition around here, but Jack's example is stunning.

Nice examples Jack and Rachel, Most if not all Ibberson I saw where knives I immediately wanted to have. Unfortunately non had come my way.

Thank you my friends :) :thumbsup:

Here's a couple of Ibberson Penknives, with advertising :)

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May 8, 2015
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Some real beauties above Jack and Herder :thumbsup: :thumbsup: ... Glad to see this thread again :) ...

Here's an IXL Wostenholm Stag Hunter that I previously posted but disappeared with the Photobucket change.. so some new photos of this knife which is one of my favorites... Though I thought maybe one would consider this an English Jack I do believe it is considered a Hunter... Solid knife with a sweet patina and the blade is about as full length as one could get (4 & 9/16" closed) - check the photo... Most likely this is dated after 1890 given England on the stamp but also the stag suggests later 1800s / early 1900s....

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Jack Black

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Some real beauties above Jack and Herder :thumbsup: :thumbsup: ... Glad to see this thread again :) ...

Here's an IXL Wostenholm Stag Hunter that I previously posted but disappeared with the Photobucket change.. so some new photos of this knife which is one of my favorites... Though I thought maybe one would consider this an English Jack I do believe it is considered a Hunter... Solid knife with a sweet patina and the blade is about as full length as one could get (4 & 9/16" closed) - check the photo... Most likely this is dated after 1890 given England on the stamp but also the stag suggests later 1800s / early 1900s....

BFlWXIE.jpg


ERzsIBg.jpg


mr1yDCF.jpg


MbV0ivR.jpg


ge8XOAT.jpg

Thanks Lee, that's a beauty, and in excellent condition given its age :thumbsup: A visually similar pattern is shown in this 1930's Wostenolm catalogue belonging to S Smiling Knife :thumbsup:

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Aug 16, 2007
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Pretty sure this little lot are from the period

Just need a similar sized Barlow to round the set off

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Jack Black

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I don't think I've shared this one here, and it should have been a better pic. I think it falls into the quill knife category. It can't be more than a couple inches long.

View attachment 1292685


The tang can hardly hold all the stamp info, LOL

Definitely a Quill Knife Glenn :) That's a nice oldie. I think I had the first one I showed above about a year before I got a glass strong enough to read the Joseph Rodgers mark! :D :thumbsup:

I'm not entirely sure how I got tagged here :D

But I'm glad I did since it's an interesting thread :D

Sorry about that! :D I meant to tag 'Smiling-Knife', but his account seems to have been closed :( Thanks for being so understanding :) :thumbsup:
 

herder

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Feb 24, 2007
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Some real beauties above Jack and Herder :thumbsup: :thumbsup: ... Glad to see this thread again :) ...

Here's an IXL Wostenholm Stag Hunter that I previously posted but disappeared with the Photobucket change.. so some new photos of this knife which is one of my favorites... Though I thought maybe one would consider this an English Jack I do believe it is considered a Hunter... Solid knife with a sweet patina and the blade is about as full length as one could get (4 & 9/16" closed) - check the photo... Most likely this is dated after 1890 given England on the stamp but also the stag suggests later 1800s / early 1900s....

BFlWXIE.jpg


ERzsIBg.jpg


mr1yDCF.jpg


MbV0ivR.jpg


ge8XOAT.jpg


LongBlade, Very nice Wostenholm example. As far as I can tell, that was the longest running pattern for Wostenholm. Aside from a few minor cosmetic changes, that model is seen as early as 1879 and as late as 1982 in company literature. It is both a classic and beautiful knife.
Here are two more examples, one pre WWII (top), and one post WWII. Later models yet had synthetic handles.

And a nice catalog illustration from Jack via Smiling-Knife.

BF Wostenholm clip pair .jpg
 
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herder

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Feb 24, 2007
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I don't think I've shared this one here, and it should have been a better pic. I think it falls into the quill knife category. It can't be more than a couple inches long.

View attachment 1292685

The tang can hardly hold all the stamp info, LOL

Glennbad, that is a beautiful little quill knife. Can you spell out the blade tang names which my old eyes can't quite make out. :)
 

danno50

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Apr 15, 2008
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Bored at home, everything in town is closed. Just looking through my knives for any worthy one that I have not previously posted. Found this cute little dagger, blade length 5", total length 8 1/2". Stamped DCx/PACIFIC/CUTLERY CO/SHEFFIELD. The x is very faint and inside the C. Nothing on this in either Tweedale's or Goins, but Levine says it was an export brand c.1890.

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Augie

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Aug 23, 2014
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Picked up this large 4" stag Repeat Needham Brothers, really a great jack. Only marked Sheffield, has an Old Favorite etch and a Federal shield which would make me think it was for the American market but not marked England I don't know as it does not appear to be pre 1890.


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Will Power

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Jan 18, 2007
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Astounding stag Augie Augie top quality. The blade etching opts for the more usual American spelling of favourite without the u. I hear that Americans did also use the British form with the u but it's died out. Pretty sure Webster's opts for favorite in the early c19th.

Might help with it being for the American market, Federal shield as well. I suppose it's possible the blades were etched after importation by a retailer?
 
Native XF ad, Below bottom BC
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