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Review Manly Folders: Comrade, Peak, Wasp. Fixed Blades: Patriot and Drugar, Made in Bulgaria

Discussion in 'Knife Reviews & Testing' started by Gary W. Graley, Mar 12, 2016.

  1. GermanyChris

    GermanyChris Gold Member Gold Member

    Feb 18, 2015
    Because that would require re-engineering the entire knife for a non-issue, look at the pictures the company posted
     
    Pilsner likes this.
  2. Morthawt

    Morthawt

    55
    May 30, 2017
    I understand that. Without hopefully repeating my whole thing, this is just to let them know about how other brands deal with the original problem, the problem that they have already pretty much solved with their new version of the wasp. Yes, now it is a non-issue, hopefully.
     
  3. Pilsner

    Pilsner Gold Member Gold Member

    Oct 28, 2017
    Again.

    They are a knife manufacturer who are well familiar with the concept of a stop pin. They make one handed back lock folders, they make fixed blades, they make slip joints. I am beginning to suspect that they know rather more about knives than you at this point.
     
  4. Morthawt

    Morthawt

    55
    May 30, 2017
    Well what I read here from Manly, led me to believe something may have been overlooked. End of story. So just in case, I posted details that are now documented, visually exampled and what they do with it, or not, is their thing.

    I just tried to help by mentioning something and didn't expect post after post "it's not needed" "I never had the problem" "it's not a problem" etc etc, so I feel like I need to further clarify and convey the reasoning because it certainly seems like people don't get it. Better is better, as evidenced by Manly doing something at all to address it.
     
  5. Pilsner

    Pilsner Gold Member Gold Member

    Oct 28, 2017
    Well, now Manly know that you want a stop pin in your functioning slip joint. And now you know that the rest of us don’t. I hope everybody has now grasped that.
     
    Dean51 likes this.
  6. Dean51

    Dean51 Basic Member Basic Member

    692
    Aug 30, 2014
    I do believe we have a troll here.
    One last post and I'm done.
     
    Pilsner likes this.
  7. Dean51

    Dean51 Basic Member Basic Member

    692
    Aug 30, 2014
    "But that YouTuber clearly unintentionally damaged his knife after 2 days of owning it."

    The you tuber didn't clearly demonstrate !#$% he had it for two days you have no idea what he did in that time from a video. He may have done something stupid like deliberately over press the blade and dent the blade.

    "I just wanted to draw attention to this, because the Manly USA representative said all slip joint knives suffer from the pressing issue and they did not consider it a flaw."

    Because it's not a flaw, by design the kick holds the blade away from the spring.
    See second posted picture in post #343.
    I have been using slipjoints for over 50 years and have somewhere over 30 and none of them has a stop pin none of them hit the spring when closing. Unless the user does something stupid like squeeze the blade into the spring.

    "What?! The benchmade I saw, as I mentioned, was a slip joint. My SOG Terminus is a slip joint. They have stop pins..."
    That's nice

    My Lionsteel barlows have a stop pin but it could just as easily have been designed to not need one. I do not want to pay more for an unnecessary pin. Stop pins are good but not necessary.

    "Generally speaking, in slip joint knives that have not specifically been engineered to prevent or limit it."

    Slipjoints have been engineered to prevent it, Ever since the first slipjoint. you're just not understanding it.

    "You shouldn't [knowingly] make a folding slip joint knife and tell customers "Don't press the blade too hard else you'll destroy the cutting edge and it will need sharpening extensively to get rid of the present dent."

    You're the first person I've heard of who has brought up the subject of over pressing the blade and denting the blade. DON'T DO IT.
     
    Dan Hammer and Pilsner like this.
  8. Morthawt

    Morthawt

    55
    May 30, 2017
    I get what you are saying. On the surface it makes total sense. It is the unforeseen things though. You cannot assume the one thing you think about (someone squeezing the blade more) is the only circumstance. For example, here is a hypothetical. I actually have a pocket organiser in my left trouser pocket where I store a bunch of my EDC items including my knife. Lets say I had no room in there for my knife so I clipped it to the side inside my pocket directly. When I sit, everything gets smooshed, especially given that there's not all that much free room in my trousers. The pressure when I sit could very very easily cram my pocket organiser right into the spine of the blade. It would not be anything done on purpose, but it would have just happened.

    This is all I am saying, better is better so it helps customers to keep their knife nice and usable without erroneous damage being incurred. Manly took steps to help with this so I thank them for that very much. But there's more than 1 way to skin a reindeer. Some are better than others.
     
  9. Morthawt

    Morthawt

    55
    May 30, 2017
    Here's Hugo's completion review of the Manly Wasp:

     
  10. brownshoe

    brownshoe I support this site with my MIND

    Sep 6, 2002
    I have many slipjoints that won't touch the back spring when squeezed or allowed to snap closed, e.g. $20 1920's designed Douk Douk, 70 yo beat to hell Schrade premium stockman, modern day Case. I have a few slipjoints that won't touch the backspring unless squeezed really hard. None of them have a stop-pin. Just good traditional designs.
     
  11. Morthawt

    Morthawt

    55
    May 30, 2017
    I think the latest revision of the Wasp falls into the latter category. I bet with excessive, vast gripping force beyond any conceivable normal amount, I could probably get it to move but even if that is the case they have started to grind down the offending contact point so that further aids things. I'm very happy with mine. But I'm the kind of guy who given two options, one better than the other, prefer the better, hence me mentioning about it based on Manly USA saying all slip joints suffer the problem. But what ever gets the job done in a more than adequate fashion is good enough.

    I thought Hugo's review was very good and I was very happy to see the teardown and reassembly. I never had considered using the alan wrench as leverage. Genius. I was trying to use my Gerber Shard wedged in the oval area of the liner to lever it and all sorts. Some how I managed to do it but it was a major major pain in the backside to achieve. I'll remember this for the future in case I ever need to disassemble it.

    Here's a video I made right after receiving it. It was more to alert people subbed to me of this knife because of the steel grade, UK legal status and amazing price point. I may make a future video on it sharing some thoughts in the future but I'll see what happens.

     
  12. cbrstar

    cbrstar

    203
    Sep 7, 2015
    I can see the appeal of this knife with it's clean lines, good fit and Finnish, and attractive price point. But a large slip joint in this day and age is just stupid and dangerous.

    My friend who is a farmer actually almost lost two fingers to a older slip joint that was passed down to him. The knife accidentally closed with quite a lot of force cutting right through his glove and through the bones. He was lucky that they were able to sew his finger back on. Even myself I had an old Barlow knife once accidentally close on me.

    The locking knife was the greatest invention in knife history. Going back to slip joints is like saying "Hey drum brakes on a car were way cooler" and then proceeding to ditch your anti lock disk brakes on your vehicle!
     
    Last edited: Oct 12, 2018
  13. Pilsner

    Pilsner Gold Member Gold Member

    Oct 28, 2017
    It ain't a large slip joint. It's less than 3". The Comrade, by the same company, is what I'd class as a large slip joint. Furthermore, both these knives have an extremely strong back spring. They are about the safest slip joint folders I have ever encountered. It would take an idiot to fall foul of theses knives, but I guess there are plenty of those about. Added to this, the Wasp, as a sub 3" slip joint, is legal to carry in countries like the UK. Not everywhere has the same knife laws.
     
    Dan Hammer likes this.
  14. Dean51

    Dean51 Basic Member Basic Member

    692
    Aug 30, 2014
    So basically what you are saying is your friend did not know how to safely use a knife.
    By saying that it means you do not know how to safely use a knife.

    If you have a knife, you should know how to safely use it so that the lock is redundant.

    You never apply pressure to the spine of a knife while cutting, whether it has a lock or not. You should never rely on a knife safety a gun safety or any safety for that mater. The safety you rely on is between your ears.

    Knives close because of user error.
    Cbrstar I suggest you and your friend take a course in basic knife safety.
    About 7:30 mins in to the above video was a perfect example of a lack of knowledge about basic knife safety.

    By the way your brake analogy was kind of silly and doesn't apply here.
     
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  15. Morthawt

    Morthawt

    55
    May 30, 2017
    Eh. I would partially agree with you. I would say slip joint knives are less safe than locking, but as someone else pointed out, Law.. In the UK we have limits and I'm not interested in having a criminal record or having a knife confiscated due to it simply being outside of the law, regardless of the situation. I am the kind of guy who will use the best that I can get, or in this case the best I am allowed. These days I am less interested in buying knives and multitools that fall outside of UK legal carry because I like the idea of getting more use out of what I spent my money on. So, rather than having a lovely Spyderco Delica or some other 3~ inch locking blade, I settle for a slip joint so that I am all legal. In addition, I keep it in a slot in my pocket organiser which sits in my trouser pocket which is somewhat a tight fit with the other items in the organiser, thus demonstrating if ever selected for a random search, that it is a tool and not a weapon (takes time to get to AND is legal any way).

    I think UK law for knife carry is very foolish. Criminals do not care about the law, law abiding people are unlikely to stab people any way regardless of what the law says and finally, locking knives are safer for the user. But, #welcometoUKlogic

    I have no problem with slip joints. I know how they work (basically speaking) and I know what they will do when pressure hits the back of the knife. As long as you understand this fully, there is very minimal chance of you cutting your fingers off.
     
    Pilsner likes this.
  16. Pilsner

    Pilsner Gold Member Gold Member

    Oct 28, 2017
    :thumbsup:

    I spent some years in the ambulance service. If somebody is going to do a stabbing, then they’ll use anything, the bigger the better, usually a kitchen knife. I went to one call when a guy got stabbed in the arse with a Swiss Army Knife, I shit you not.

    Thanks to Manly, Enzo and Spyderco, we have three UK options in really good steels:

    Manly Wasp S90V
    Enzo PK70 S30V
    Spyderco UKPK S110V

    Buck also make a model called the Ridgeway, heh, but I believe it is their standard 420hc. Nice looking knife though.

    The Manly is the best value, but they are all cracking little knives. It’s a nice thing that these companies see the need we have and cater to it.

    Anyway - back on topic:

    Manly knives are blooming excellent.
     
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  17. Morthawt

    Morthawt

    55
    May 30, 2017
    Very good points and good models of knife you listed. Unfortunately for someone like me with more limited funds for fun/hobby purchases like new knives (when I already have knives that are perfectly fit for purpose :D) I have to watch what I spend. So I have never bought a supersteel knife until the Manly Wasp because even if I could wangle the spend, I cannot even justify it to myself. I am not a diehard collector or anything, I'm just a guy with a nice EDC and I like nice things that are useful. So for me, the Manly range is a godsend.

    Here is an ancient mediocre poem I just uncovered from inside this forum reply box:

    While browsing, as I do, on Heinnie's site.
    I saw a new knife and fell into delight.

    My eyes did pop out of their sockets
    as my hand went into my pockets.

    To consult with my wallet of card and money.
    For a new super-steeled blade, made by Manly.


    No idea how it got there, but I felt like leaving it :p
     
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  18. cbrstar

    cbrstar

    203
    Sep 7, 2015
    Sorry but safety is never redundant.
    You mention gun safety. Well guns have safety's on them because even to the most experience shooter can slip fall and have an accident so your point is pretty moot.

    In my friends case it was just really bad luck. He was tending to his horses hoof and something spooked the horse and it jumped knocking the knife closed on his fingers. Something a lock back would have totally prevented. As the old saying goes an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure.

    Anyways I'm getting off topic...I just wanted to say that I do like Manly knives and their lock back model is now on my want list.
     
  19. Morthawt

    Morthawt

    55
    May 30, 2017
    Remember, you can carry any knife (pretty much) if you have a valid reason for it. Such as a chef on their way to or from work etc. So there is no reason why someone working with horses and doing hoof maintenance with a knife can't have a locking blade on them. They can. It was their decision to use an existing knife they had which had no locking mechanism.

    Person against inanimate object leads to greater accuracy in expectation and prediction/planning. But you take the situation of Person + animal + knife and logic should tell you to be very careful, I don't care if it's a slip joint or a fixed blade. The more risk in the situation, the more caution and proper tool choice are paramount.

    Even a nice locking folder or a fixed blade, when around a kicking horse could lead to it ending up flying and being embedded in an artery in your arm for example. Physics.

    I cut my hand a bit while sharpening a slipjoint knife that was of course fully open. It slipped out of my hand as I stopped sharpening and I stupidly went to grab it so it wouldn't stab my leg. I ended up deflecting it away from me, but my failed grab cut my finger in the process. A locking knife is not going to stop a free-falling or animal-propelled knife from ending up somewhere painful.
     
    Last edited: Oct 12, 2018
  20. Pilsner

    Pilsner Gold Member Gold Member

    Oct 28, 2017
    Haha

    Yeah, Heinnie is the absolute business: great customer service and fantastic range. I must get down there to visit in person one of these days. Maybe next time I get over to the Brecons - it’s not too far from there. As far as I know they were the first UK retailer to stock Manly, possibly still the only one. What would we do without them?!

    I think we should take slip joint safety discussion to a new thread, to be honest. This is a great review thread started by Gary and it’s getting a little sidetracked!
     

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