traditional knives in movies

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And yet, the SAK is the most recognized and sociably acceptable pocket knife in almost every setting.

True. And I wish there were more scenes in movies where pocketknives were used in a benign manner.

I will mention that back in the ‘90s, one woman who saw me cutting paper with the scissors on my tiny Victorinox Classic informed me that I was carrying a deadly weapon. :(

Jim
 
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Don’t know if this was mentioned already, but the James Cameron movie Titanic showed some pocketknives. One shown briefly with DiCaprio’s character’s art supplies, and others used by the ship’s crew (or just men onboard) to cut some ropes holding the lifeboats. IIRC, some were opening their knives (which might have been sailor’s knives) with their teeth.

Jim
 

Jolipapa

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True. And I wish there were more scenes in movies where pocketknives were used in a benign manner.

...

Jim
An old french commercial, no toast has been hurt :D
UvW94XSObJQ
 

btb01

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…I wish there were more scenes in movies where pocketknives were used in a benign manner.

Here are some examples from this thread:

Remove a splinter
Cut an orange
Eat an apple
Pick a lock
Cut a zip tie
Cut a sandwich
On display in a general store
Unscrew a vent cover
Peel an apple
Cut twine at a Christmas tree lot
Ghostbusting
Whittling (second part of the post)
General outdoor use
Cut some rope
Show to a friend
Cut some beef jerky (if I remember correctly)
Show to Bill, Dale and Boomhauer
Whittle
Eat a steak
Whittle again
Make an existential statement
Meal prep
Cut a plug of tobacco (second part of post)
Repair a raft
Use as a guitar slide
Make a musical instrument
Whittle on the porch
Pocket dump
Work on a vineyard
Sharpen a pencil
Give as a gift
Cut some tape
More porch whittling
Even more whittling
Eat some cheese
Open a Christmas present
Examine a map
More whittling
Carve a whistle
Cut some flowers
Cut a small branch from a tree
Amateur electrical work
Hand down to your son


Don’t know if this was mentioned already, but the James Cameron movie Titanic…

It’s been mentioned to the extent that it’s become a running joke in this thread. :rolleyes: The search function is your friend. :thumbsup:

Also, since you seem interested in this subject, I might recommend just browsing the whole thread; it’s only 36 pages (pretty short for threads around here). I just did it in about 30 minutes (and that was while copying links for the examples above) and it was quite enjoyable.
 

Jack Black

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Remember this one?


Jim

LOL! :D Brilliant! I've never seen that before :D :thumbsup:


Well done Barrett :cool: :) :thumbsup:

I've never even seen Titanic , and thanks to this thread I have no need to watch it! :D ;) :thumbsup:
 
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I’ll go through more of the thread. Thanks.

*EDIT: Shoot! I’ve even posted to this thread years ago! :eek:

Jim
 
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LOL! :D Brilliant! I've never seen that before :D :thumbsup:



Well done Barrett :cool: :) :thumbsup:

I've never even seen Titanic , and thanks to this thread I have no need to watch it! :D ;) :thumbsup:

You’re not missing much. I stopped enjoying the Cameron movies that came after T2: Judgment Day. :p

Back to knife content, in the Kurt Russell movie Breakdown, the truck driver villain brings home a “genuine Swiss Army Knife” for his son.

Jim
 
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scrteened porch

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"Big Show with Steve Allen" is apparently where Sid Caesar did his classic Irish drama based on Irish Spring commercials. I was just looking. And Steve Allen as Rula Lenska.
 
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I don't recall seeing a reference to "12 Angry Men" from 1957 in this thread. An Italian style switchblade figures prominently in the movie.
[Warning: Spoiler alert, if you haven't seen the movie.] Do a YouTube search for "making of twelve angry men" and you'll see dozens of analyses, discussions, comments by the actors, and more. This film, while not a commercial success domestically, did well internationally. It's been remade at least twice here and once in Russia! Several TV shows have incorporated the general story line as an episode or portion of an episode. Hardly a year passes without some amateur stage production of the story somewhere in America! The movie is used in film schools and even high school civics classes, and it's been recognized by the ABA as a sterling example of the legal system at work (even though Fonda's character and the others engaged in illegal activities!) It is practically a course in directing and cinematography, and its somewhere on virtually every "best movies of all time" list--AFI, IMDB for two. The story by Reginald Rose was originally done as a live TV drama in 1954. Henry Fonda liked it so much that he decided to produce it as a movie.

About the knife (knives). I've searched extensively on this. The consensus of both knowledgeable and ordinary people is that the knives were bought and then painted with the unusual dragon graphics by the movie prop department. As a semi-collector's item, I've considered buying one of the basic auto-stiletto, kriss blade type and getting an artist to mimic the dragon graphic. Unfortunately, the only pictures I can find or grab from the movie show the same side of both knives, so I have to assume both sides were painted the same. Here's a pic.
https://3.bp.blogspot.com/-PEGnvcSO2JU/UP8WBGGAEII/AAAAAAAAMw8/cv35OBhwklQ/s640/8.JPG
 

btb01

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[Warning: Spoiler alert, if you haven't seen the movie.] Do a YouTube search for "making of twelve angry men" and you'll see dozens of analyses, discussions, comments by the actors, and more. This film, while not a commercial success domestically, did well internationally. It's been remade at least twice here and once in Russia! Several TV shows have incorporated the general story line as an episode or portion of an episode. Hardly a year passes without some amateur stage production of the story somewhere in America! The movie is used in film schools and even high school civics classes, and it's been recognized by the ABA as a sterling example of the legal system at work (even though Fonda's character and the others engaged in illegal activities!) It is practically a course in directing and cinematography, and its somewhere on virtually every "best movies of all time" list--AFI, IMDB for two. The story by Reginald Rose was originally done as a live TV drama in 1954. Henry Fonda liked it so much that he decided to produce it as a movie.

About the knife (knives). I've searched extensively on this. The consensus of both knowledgeable and ordinary people is that the knives were bought and then painted with the unusual dragon graphics by the movie prop department. As a semi-collector's item, I've considered buying one of the basic auto-stiletto, kriss blade type and getting an artist to mimic the dragon graphic. Unfortunately, the only pictures I can find or grab from the movie show the same side of both knives, so I have to assume both sides were painted the same. Here's a pic.
https://3.bp.blogspot.com/-PEGnvcSO2JU/UP8WBGGAEII/AAAAAAAAMw8/cv35OBhwklQ/s640/8.JPG

Thanks for the info. :thumbsup: I hope you don’t mind if I re-share your screenshot so it appears here in the thread without having to click a link:

8.JPG


Edited to add a larger version of the same shot:

HycWUW7.png


It makes sense that those would’ve been customized by the film’s props department, since the plot requires a distinctive knife.
 
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btb01

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Messages
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[Warning: Spoiler alert, if you haven't seen the movie.] Do a YouTube search for "making of twelve angry men" and you'll see dozens of analyses, discussions, comments by the actors, and more. This film, while not a commercial success domestically, did well internationally. It's been remade at least twice here and once in Russia! Several TV shows have incorporated the general story line as an episode or portion of an episode. Hardly a year passes without some amateur stage production of the story somewhere in America! The movie is used in film schools and even high school civics classes, and it's been recognized by the ABA as a sterling example of the legal system at work (even though Fonda's character and the others engaged in illegal activities!) It is practically a course in directing and cinematography, and its somewhere on virtually every "best movies of all time" list--AFI, IMDB for two. The story by Reginald Rose was originally done as a live TV drama in 1954. Henry Fonda liked it so much that he decided to produce it as a movie.

About the knife (knives). I've searched extensively on this. The consensus of both knowledgeable and ordinary people is that the knives were bought and then painted with the unusual dragon graphics by the movie prop department. As a semi-collector's item, I've considered buying one of the basic auto-stiletto, kriss blade type and getting an artist to mimic the dragon graphic. Unfortunately, the only pictures I can find or grab from the movie show the same side of both knives, so I have to assume both sides were painted the same. Here's a pic.
https://3.bp.blogspot.com/-PEGnvcSO2JU/UP8WBGGAEII/AAAAAAAAMw8/cv35OBhwklQ/s640/8.JPG

As far as having one made to look like the knife from the film, there is a shot of the other side of the knife, just a few seconds before the screenshot you shared. Here it is:

TzOJC8P.png


Here are the mark and pile sides of the evidence knife together:

i0RBjN5.jpg
 
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