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"Carl's Lounge" (Off-Topic Discussion, Traditional Knife "Tales & Vignettes")

Discussion in 'Traditional Folders and Fixed Blades' started by jackknife, Jul 5, 2010.

  1. Will Power

    Will Power Gold Member Gold Member

    Jan 18, 2007
    It's a full-scale invasion :eek::eek::cool:

    Starlings are a fair mimic too and can manage all sorts of weird whistles & sounds, murmuration indeed :D
     
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  2. Ramrodmb

    Ramrodmb Gold Member Gold Member

    Jun 9, 2010
    None has been more destructive to native wildlife as the European Starling. They push out native cavity nesters like bluebirds, owls, and woodpeckers. Large flocks can damagecrops, and their waste can spread invasive seeds and transmit disease. They're loud and annoying, and they're everywhere.Mar 9, 2016
    upload_2020-11-22_21-5-48.png
    National Audubon Society › news
    Birdist Rule #72: It's Okay to Dislike Some Birds | Audubon
     
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  3. Peregrin

    Peregrin Traditional Forum Moderator Moderator Gold Member

    Sep 2, 2004
    That's all true. I don't like seeing them around. Particularly in the quantities I saw the other day!
     
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  4. veitsi_poika

    veitsi_poika Platinum Member Platinum Member

    Nov 25, 2016
    I said they were pretty, I didn't say I liked them ;), sort of like The Spice Girls :D Whenever the Starlings stop by our house on their migration paths, we don't fill up our feeders until they move on.
     
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  5. scrteened porch

    scrteened porch Basic Member Basic Member

    Feb 19, 2012
    I believe our European ancestors used to eat their thigh and breast meat. Non-vegans, arise!
     
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  6. Jack Black

    Jack Black Gold Member Gold Member

    Dec 2, 2005
    Vast flocks of starlings fly around the skies of the town and cities here. We get quite a few on Leeds market, and they usually check out the tools on my mate's tool stall :rolleyes:

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  7. Headwinds

    Headwinds Basic Member Basic Member

    582
    Jan 15, 2016
    The worst of it is - the starling was deliberately brought into North America in 1890 by a genius who thought it would be neat to have all of the birds mentioned in the plays of William Shakespeare represented over here. Sort of like the idiots who think it’s neat to bring Burmese pythons into Florida.
     
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  8. scrteened porch

    scrteened porch Basic Member Basic Member

    Feb 19, 2012
    And Nile monitor lizards.
     
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  9. Jack Black

    Jack Black Gold Member Gold Member

    Dec 2, 2005
    Someone mentioned this in the Guardians thread the other week! o_O Just about caps it all in terms of stupidity o_O Here's a pic of a red-eared terrapin I saw sunning itself by the side of Leeds-Liverpool canal a few years back, about the size of a dinner plate :confused:

    [​IMG]
     
  10. Jack Black

    Jack Black Gold Member Gold Member

    Dec 2, 2005
    For a moment there, I was trying to think of which Shakespearean play Nile Monitor Lizards were mentioned in! :D :thumbsup:
     
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  11. JB in SC

    JB in SC Basic Member Basic Member

    May 19, 2001
    Not much worse than Kudzu...the plant that ate the South.
     
  12. Prester John

    Prester John Gold Member Gold Member

    May 20, 2018
    Wasn't it The Tempest?
     
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  13. Jack Black

    Jack Black Gold Member Gold Member

    Dec 2, 2005
    And there was a reason Australia needed the Bunny Knife :rolleyes: :eek:



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  14. Headwinds

    Headwinds Basic Member Basic Member

    582
    Jan 15, 2016
    But it seemed like such a good idea at the time.........o_O
     
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  15. meako

    meako Gold Member Gold Member

    Sep 4, 2006
    @Jack Black and @Prester John ..Historically ,Shakespeare is a swampy area at best ...perfect habitat for large monitors...as this recently discovered page from one of his notebooks proves...the text is much faded and the pages torn but it has been deciphered to read:
    Romeo:what light on yonder wndow breaks?' Tis Juliet and the ..WHHAAOOO!!! YOWWW! A FRIKKIN NILE MONITOR!!!.
    Juliet: Nay Romeo my love be'st not afeared tis not a Nile Monitor ...but methinks 'tis more like a Lace Monitor ir Goanna from the shires of New Hollan...AAAAAHHHGG CHRRRIIIIST! ROMEOOO...do something ! It climbeth up the vine ..KILL IT!....

    The transcript is vague after that.....but the rampant reptile appears briefly again in this early copy of Julius Caesar..

    Caesar: Friends Romans Countrym...JEEEEEZUS look at size of that thing....its gotta be 7ft and look at those claws..

    Sounds a lot like a large monitor to me.
     
  16. JTB_5

    JTB_5 Gold Member Gold Member

    Oct 6, 2017
    I thought all of the large monitors in Shakespeare were bawdy innuendos; large lizards entering dark caves to claim as their lairs and hatch little lizards, and such.
     
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  17. Jack Black

    Jack Black Gold Member Gold Member

    Dec 2, 2005
    :D :D :D :thumbsup:
     
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  18. Jack Black

    Jack Black Gold Member Gold Member

    Dec 2, 2005
    :rolleyes: :D :thumbsup:
     
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  19. Will Power

    Will Power Gold Member Gold Member

    Jan 18, 2007
    Not sure about that, Starlings are rather feral. Songbirds, Buntings, Thrushes, Larks are still netted in the thousands in parts of Europe as a 'delicacy' one cruel 'tradition' that needs ending...:poop:
     
  20. scrteened porch

    scrteened porch Basic Member Basic Member

    Feb 19, 2012
    My maternal grandfather in London used to catch sparrows in a net to eat. I don't know about the thrushes and larks.
     
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