Guardians of The Lambsfoot!

Jack Black

Gold Member
Joined
Dec 2, 2005
Messages
46,608
Sorry to hear about the lousy evening.:thumbsdown: One thing is sure - your Lambsfoot knives never get drunk and rowdy - LOL :D


Speaking of that I have my Ebony in the ole pocket today:thumbsup: - I think I will go down to the barber and get a few hairs cut - a little scruffy but sharp scissors will cure that.;) View attachment 1638033
Thanks a lot Bill, it got worse! o_O Thankfully not, though Lucy has had her moments! :eek: ;) Enjoy your haircut :) Great pic :thumbsup:
The other side of Racin'stripes Rosie.
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Not very clear, but a little dramatic, perhaps.
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Very cool Jer :cool: :thumbsup:
Thanks Jack I did. I've got a list of pubs and brewery taps to visit in the north west before they all get shut again.
That Sparrow looks handy; I was thinking myself of carving a wooden slingshot but with summer being so busy it's just one more thing thats slipped past. Maybe a project for the autumn...
I hope your knees improving.



The ovine gods must of been smiling on you that day :thumbsup:

The pics a couple of weeks old.
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Here's hoping everyone's weekend is calm and relaxing.
Yeah, I can see that coming David, place I went to last night (very briefly) was absolutely rammed! :rolleyes: Hope you get to some of those good places :) Go for it, with the slingshot, makes a lot of sense :cool: Here's one (below), I made for my pal's wee lad a few months back :) Thanks mate, hoping to avoid going to the hospital with my knee if I can :) Nice pic :thumbsup:

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John, that photo is absolutely FANTASTIC! :cool: :thumbsup:

My Hartshead Barlow has been cutting up a lot of cardboard today, so I gave it a strop :thumbsup:

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brewbear

Basic Member
Joined
Nov 14, 2019
Messages
386
So I did a bit of cleaning, unfortunately the previous owner glued the broken bits with something like JB Weld and left some unsightly smears that I couldn't get off. The blade is quite sharp and I don't want to bring it to a shine, I feel the knife has a lot of character as is. I did give it a good oil bath, more rust than dirt dripped out. It has a good snap but it has a slight side to side wobble. I will try to correct the wobble but I will leave the rest as is.

P.S. My eyes aren't as keen as they used to be but I believe the tang stamp is E.BLYDE on top and &Co LTD underneath.
 
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cudgee

Gold Member
Joined
May 13, 2019
Messages
3,402
So I did a bit of cleaning, unfortunately the previous owner glued the broken bits with something like JB Weld and left some unsightly smears that I couldn't get off. The blade is quite sharp and I don't want to bring it to a shine, I feel the knife has a lot of character as is. I did give it a good oil bath, more rust than dirt dripped out. It has a good snap but it has a slight side to side wobble. I will try to correct the wobble but I will leave the rest as is.

P.S. My eyes aren't as keen as they used to be but I believe the tang stamp is E.BLYDE on top and &Co LTD underneath.
You have done a great job with what you had to work with. I would not worry too much about those glue smears, the whole repair job could crumble if you try to smooth them out, it is like old dental work, if they are holding together just leave them, if you start trying to repair it, whole thing may fall apart. 🤯 🤣:thumbsup:
 

brewbear

Basic Member
Joined
Nov 14, 2019
Messages
386
You have done a great job with what you had to work with. I would not worry too much about those glue smears, the whole repair job could crumble if you try to smooth them out, it is like old dental work, if they are holding together just leave them, if you start trying to repair it, whole thing may fall apart. 🤯 🤣:thumbsup:
Thank you, sir.I know exactly what you mean. One of my other hobbies is glass work and I usually say that my best work is in the trash bucket. Every single time I try to do just one last tiny "improvement "to an otherwise almost perfect piece, I end up ruining the whole thing..
Back to our patient, I didn't want to wack it with a hammer so i used a piece of leather on the bolster and put it in a vise. I figured it would put even pressure on both sides at the same time. The wobble is significantly reduced so I'm happy with it.
 

Jack Black

Gold Member
Joined
Dec 2, 2005
Messages
46,608
So I did a bit of cleaning, unfortunately the previous owner glued the broken bits with something like JB Weld and left some unsightly smears that I couldn't get off. The blade is quite sharp and I don't want to bring it to a shine, I feel the knife has a lot of character as is. I did give it a good oil bath, more rust than dirt dripped out. It has a good snap but it has a slight side to side wobble. I will try to correct the wobble but I will leave the rest as is.

P.S. My eyes aren't as keen as they used to be but I believe the tang stamp is E.BLYDE on top and &Co LTD underneath.
I think you do right to leave the patina Ted, 000 grade wire wool will remove rust without polishing the blade, but I usually just use oil and a green pad myself. Sorry to hear about the blade play, not too common on old Sheffield knives in my experience, but it depends on what the knife was used for of course. Re-tightening the joint with a vice is the right way to correct the play, but you may need to peen the pins to prevent it reoccurring. You can do that with a small hammer, and/or with the aid of a punch. I'm pretty lazy when it comes to fettlin' old knives, and generally agree with Leon. Really nice old knife :thumbsup:

According to Geoff Tweedale, Edwin Blyde's earlier trade catalogues claimed the firm was established in 1794, but 20th century letterheads stated 1854. Bearing in mind that Mr Blyde was born in 1843, the latter date seems more accurate ;) Edwin Blyde had a reputation as a 'wheeler-dealer', and had a somewhat complex business history, with numerous partnerships, changes of address, and a legal case after he supplied cutlery marked 'Mappin & Sons' to a London retailer. He died in 1914, having sold his business to Walter Trickett two years previously. Blyde's was still operating in 1980, with Trickett's old Anglo Works, still standing in Sheffield city centre, having been renovated, and turned into a bar :thumbsup:

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Sunday Morning Breakfast. Crispy, and i mean crispy bacon on an English muffin, with tomato sauce and pepper.:p:p:p.

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That looks very tasty Leon, there's only one thing missing! 😛😉

Good morning Guardians, I haven't carried my SamDamLamb for a while, and it seemed like a good choice for my Sunday carry ;) Have a great day everyone :thumbsup:

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Joined
Apr 12, 2014
Messages
424
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Well I think I finally resolved this problem child of mine. A bottle of WD-40 later and 3 days or so of opening and closing it constantly and its smoothed out significantly. I was worried for a moment, it seized up really badly for a while, I could only open it half way and had to push the blade open on a flat surface. And it wouldn't close without some encouragement. But forcing it open and closed over and over popped whatever was jammed in there out. Alls well that ends well.
 

brewbear

Basic Member
Joined
Nov 14, 2019
Messages
386
I think you do right to leave the patina Ted, 000 grade wire wool will remove rust without polishing the blade, but I usually just use oil and a green pad myself. Sorry to hear about the blade play, not too common on old Sheffield knives in my experience, but it depends on what the knife was used for of course. Re-tightening the joint with a vice is the right way to correct the play, but you may need to peen the pins to prevent it reoccurring. You can do that with a small hammer, and/or with the aid of a punch. I'm pretty lazy when it comes to fettlin' old knives, and generally agree with Leon. Really nice old knife :thumbsup:

According to Geoff Tweedale, Edwin Blyde's earlier trade catalogues claimed the firm was established in 1794, but 20th century letterheads stated 1854. Bearing in mind that Mr Blyde was born in 1843, the latter date seems more accurate ;) Edwin Blyde had a reputation as a 'wheeler-dealer', and had a somewhat complex business history, with numerous partnerships, changes of address, and a legal case after he supplied cutlery marked 'Mappin & Sons' to a London retailer. He died in 1914, having sold his business to Walter Trickett two years previously. Blyde's was still operating in 1980, with Trickett's old Anglo Works, still standing in Sheffield city centre, having been renovated, and turned into a bar :thumbsup:

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6emNelq.jpg


qSzIiXF.jpg



That looks very tasty Leon, there's only one thing missing! 😛😉

Good morning Guardians, I haven't carried my SamDamLamb for a while, and it seemed like a good choice for my Sunday carry ;) Have a great day everyone :thumbsup:

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First things first! Thank you for the background history, it is great to know the knife's provenance. The pictures of the cutler's shop is the cherry on the cake!!!!
The rust has been carefully removed, it seems this knife wasn't oiled in a very long time and most of the rust was inside, possibly contributing to the side-to-side play. I may try to peen it as you advised but really most of the sloppy movement is gone. I have no way of telling how this knife was used but it had quite a bit of separation at the bolster and the "vise treatment" corrected 95% of that problem. All in all, it is a very usable knife even though it is a bit on the larger side of the pattern (a big 'un).
Happy Sunday and stay safe Guardians.
 

Jack Black

Gold Member
Joined
Dec 2, 2005
Messages
46,608
H65a6g4.jpeg


Well I think I finally resolved this problem child of mine. A bottle of WD-40 later and 3 days or so of opening and closing it constantly and its smoothed out significantly. I was worried for a moment, it seized up really badly for a while, I could only open it half way and had to push the blade open on a flat surface. And it wouldn't close without some encouragement. But forcing it open and closed over and over popped whatever was jammed in there out. Alls well that ends well.
That's good news, it definitely sounds like something was stuck in there. How is the action now? Maybe still worth giving the joint a good blow-out? :thumbsup:
First things first! Thank you for the background history, it is great to know the knife's provenance. The pictures of the cutler's shop is the cherry on the cake!!!!
The rust has been carefully removed, it seems this knife wasn't oiled in a very long time and most of the rust was inside, possibly contributing to the side-to-side play. I may try to peen it as you advised but really most of the sloppy movement is gone. I have no way of telling how this knife was used but it had quite a bit of separation at the bolster and the "vise treatment" corrected 95% of that problem. All in all, it is a very usable knife even though it is a bit on the larger side of the pattern (a big 'un).
Happy Sunday and stay safe Guardians.
I seem to recall doing a longer write-up on Blyde recently, so you may be able to find that with a search. The Edwin Blyde name is still being used on Sheffield-produced pewter ware :thumbsup: Many of the old knives that reach us have survived years of abuse and poor storage. It's very fit for your pocket now Ted, congratulations on a worthwhile rescue :)

I hope everyone is having a pleasant Sunday. I went for a walk with a mate of mine, who lives down the road from me, and his lad Cillian. I made Cillian a slingshot a while back, so the three of us went out to have some practice. I bought some cans of pop, and brought a pound of so of clay ammunition, which we used to shred the cans. It was a pretty long, and enjoyable session :) Cillian had a paddle in the brook, and then we went to a local brewery for a pint. I offered to take the family out for a meal, so we met up with my mate's missus and young daughter, and went to a swanky Indian place, which was pretty nice :thumbsup:

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Joined
Apr 12, 2014
Messages
424
That's good news, it definitely sounds like something was stuck in there. How is the action now? Maybe still worth giving the joint a good blow-out? :thumbsup:

I seem to recall doing a longer write-up on Blyde recently, so you may be able to find that with a search. The Edwin Blyde name is still being used on Sheffield-produced pewter ware :thumbsup: Many of the old knives that reach us have survived years of abuse and poor storage. It's very fit for your pocket now Ted, congratulations on a worthwhile rescue :)

I hope everyone is having a pleasant Sunday. I went for a walk with a mate of mine, who lives down the road from me, and his lad Cillian. I made Cillian a slingshot a while back, so the three of us went out to have some practice. I bought some cans of pop, and brought a pound of so of clay ammunition, which we used to shred the cans. It was a pretty long, and enjoyable session :) Cillian had a paddle in the brook, and then we went to a local brewery for a pint. I offered to take the family out for a meal, so we met up with my mate's missus and young daughter, and went to a swanky Indian place, which was pretty nice :thumbsup:

BzxYK1H.jpg
The action is pretty smooth now with nice wall and talk. I never did see anything pop out but something must have at some point, the spring sunk just a hair below the liners whereas before it was flush. Who knows. 🤔
I'm just glad it's still tight with no wobble and kept its centering. Besides the horrendous action it was great, perfectly center with only a tiny gap in the liners. With the action much improved it's about as near to perfect as I'd expect a run of the mill knife from A Wright & Sons to get.
 
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