Modern fighting knives? Not military combat!

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There was a member here "possum" some years back who was a farmer and occasionally had to get into small spaces to kill raccoons with knives. His experience was that the most critical attribute for success was a very pointy tip.

I remember him, one of his favorite hunting knives was an extra long coffin handled Bowie with a long Sheffield style swedged clip point.
 

The Zieg

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Maybe it's just the city folk in me but I would think if the threat of these dogs is as real as you say, you'd want the rifle at hand, practical or not.

All that aside, from a logical standpoint a slashing knife wouldn't seem ideal, if a dog has any kind of thicker coat the fur would hinder the blade (an evolved defense, think of lion's manes or bears coats). A stabbing weapon sounds better, and a quick one.
Hence the 17th and 18th century "hunting sword".

Zieg
 

gamma_nyc

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If it were me, I would get a subcompact 9mm (Eg p365), carry a hammer as another member suggested, and for knife I think a Winkler/Case Skinner would fit the bill. Great penetrating type, Winkler ergos and heat treated steel...winner.
 
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fwiw, yes, a knife can be useful if you know how to use it and have ice blood to remain calm - a simple walking stick (or pepper spray) is 100% better in every way - keeps distance, and it will bite the stick instead of you, and a few good kicks will end most attacks

if you don't have a walking stick, the best way to deal with a dog that is actively attacking is make a fist with your jacket sleeve or heavy leather/canvas workgloves (working on a fence right?), stick it out in front of you & when the dog bites, keep pushing your fist to the back of it's throat

your other hand can then easily punch its sensitive nose, which should make them disengage most times...
if it's a crazy attack breed, you may have to use your other arm to choke it out or get around it and force its neck back (nose pointing to the sky) if it has a collar, grab it with your other hand from behind and twist; very effective choke which will make even the most crazy dog pass out pretty quickly

if there is no collar, headlock it with your free arm & squeeze the carotid artery to try for the same result

I do not recommend anyone go hand-to-hand vs an attacking dog, but if you're forced into it, this approach is better than most
 
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There was a member here "possum" some years back who was a farmer and occasionally had to get into small spaces to kill raccoons with knives. His experience was that the most critical attribute for success was a very pointy tip.
He's got a point. And that's a really good tip :D
 
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If I was in Texas - I'd carry a gun honestly.

But since I'm European, my first go-to would be pepper spray, then I would consider boar spear, then a machete or a mace... if it really had to be a knife, I'd just take my Warcraft Tanto.
 

000Robert

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The few I have seen sell were way out of my price range or I would have jumped on one. Back when they were in production, weren't they in the ~$450 and up range? Now they seem to be collector's items with a price to match but, maybe I'm not looking in the right places.

The CPK DEF is the one that you would want. But it is a little above your price range. But it's worth it. I have a CPK UF and I can't wait till I can get a DEF.
 
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Maybe it's just the city folk in me but I would think if the threat of these dogs is as real as you say, you'd want the rifle at hand, practical or not.

The problem is, with my hand full of fencing plier, chainsaw, or ... the rifle isn't going to be on my person as I walk the barbwire or electric fence. Running a chainsaw has my attention on a different threat to my own limbs as leg or hand cuts are a real risk if not paying attention and, I have been whacked a time or two by a limb under tension I didn't see. Having a rifle or shotgun on my person isn't realistic under these conditions.
All that aside, from a logical standpoint a slashing knife wouldn't seem ideal, if a dog has any kind of thicker coat the fur would hinder the blade (an evolved defense, think of lion's manes or bears coats). A stabbing weapon sounds better, and a quick one.
Yes, a heavy winter coat of fur would be a tough one to slash effectively. Most of these dogs in question are not of that type and all I have personally killed were more slick coated sporting types of dogs. Lab sized dogs are not that common with a huge number of smaller slick coated dogs which I assume are cheaper to feed and make more noise to alert the dopers some is after their stash.
 
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There was a member here "possum" some years back who was a farmer and occasionally had to get into small spaces to kill raccoons with knives. His experience was that the most critical attribute for success was a very pointy tip.

For them and possums, a 22lr pistol when they are reasonably cornered is what works best for me. Out in the open, a shotgun is best as they move fast but, collateral damage due to pellets hitting the house, cars or, barns is an issue.
 
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I'd take a cattle prod over any knife for dealing with nasty dogs.

If that works for you, great! A cattle prod might be good for one family dog but, not a really aggressive one or a pack of three. YMMV.
 
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fwiw, yes, a knife can be useful if you know how to use it and have ice blood to remain calm - a simple walking stick (or pepper spray) is 100% better in every way - keeps distance, and it will bite the stick instead of you, and a few good kicks will end most attacks

if you don't have a walking stick, the best way to deal with a dog that is actively attacking is make a fist with your jacket sleeve or heavy leather/canvas workgloves (working on a fence right?), stick it out in front of you & when the dog bites, keep pushing your fist to the back of it's throat

your other hand can then easily punch its sensitive nose, which should make them disengage most times...
if it's a crazy attack breed, you may have to use your other arm to choke it out or get around it and force its neck back (nose pointing to the sky) if it has a collar, grab it with your other hand from behind and twist; very effective choke which will make even the most crazy dog pass out pretty quickly

if there is no collar, headlock it with your free arm & squeeze the carotid artery to try for the same result

I do not recommend anyone go hand-to-hand vs an attacking dog, but if you're forced into it, this approach is better than most

Yes, if it is on me, what you suggest is appropriate depending on the dynamics of the situation and my own nerves and motivation at the time.

If it is on my left arm, being able to lift and slash its throat with my dominant right is a start. If I can't hit that or stab into the side for a lung shot, zipping the belly is next. Trying to poke the heart or wait for the lungs to fill up with either blood or air is less desirable.

Having them run away when initially attacked in the past with a rifle or walking stick was generally not successful unless it was the local animal hoarder's puppies causing mayhem with the cattle, which actually killed a newborn calf. I still remember the walking stick event where two labs barked and stayed in front of me while a third circled behind to attack. Eventually, I worked my way to safety.

Thankfully, I'm not currently looking at breeds larger than Labradors. Anatolians, Rotties, etc. are a much harder challenge in up close and personal attacks. Something like an axe is too slow for a 20~30lb dog especially in a pack of 3 or more which is what I'm currently dealing with.
 
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If I was in Texas - I'd carry a gun honestly.

But since I'm European, my first go-to would be pepper spray, then I would consider boar spear, then a machete or a mace... if it really had to be a knife, I'd just take my Warcraft Tanto.

I've spent a lot of time in Europe, not as a soldier, and European views of firearms use and ownership on this side of the Atlantic is a bit unrealistic in almost all cases. Yes, I can walk around with a loaded rifle legally but, being surrounding by curious onlookers could be good or bad. Good as I'm not the only target of the dogs, bad because I can't really get my job completed with curiosity or personal opinons being hurled at me. Sort of like being on a train in Italy with something that gives me away as a 'yank'! I've got the shoes, backpack, clothing, etc. down but, that accent gives me away every time! If only a smile or nod worked every time!

City folks moving out to the "country" think they can do "anything they want" and don't have to answer to anyone. This means the animal hoarder lady that was evicted from her house in a large town ~150 miles away thinks she doesn't need to kennel them anymore and won't reduce their numbers. The same goes for the meth cooker that went to jail after burning his shed to the ground during a 'cook'. I wouldn't care about the marijuana if they kept the smoke on their property and didn't raise aggressive dogs.
 

Crag the Brewer

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Not sure if it's been mentioned yet, but check out the Becker BK21.
It was designed by Hank Reinhardt, he's a legend, and the knife feels smaller and livelier than it looks.....not much could chop, stab, or slash better.

I think if it were slug over in a baldric? Rig it would carry nice
 
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I’ve traveled all over the world and never had issues with these ravenous packs of 20 to 30 pound dogs you speak of .....this is all rather silly...are you running around with a string of hot dogs around your neck .....if so just drop the hot dogs the dogs will leave you alone
 
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Svord Hog Beater 11.5 blade
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longbow

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I agree on the absurdity of it all BUT there have been documented attacks on people from the Eastern Coyote, 2 of them fatal and the first person involved was a girl in Canada and she was partially consumed. Also several yrs ago a woman was mauled pretty severely by a pack of "wild dogs" in Yates County in NYS sort of near where I live.


Here is a story that happened years ago to my best friend and his brother walking the Finger Lakes Trail across by friends house. Years ago my best friend with his baby boy, and his brother and his brothers English Setter were walking a bit on the Finger Lakes trail right across from where my BF lived near Hornell NY. His brother's setter was attacked by a pack of wild dogs and killed. Torn to pieces as a matter of fact. A combination of loose pitbulls and big ass farm dogs. The farm dogs started the attack. My buddy and his baby son hightailed it outta of there and his brother had to climb a tree to get away from the dogs. He was trying to fend the pack of dogs off. By the time by buddy got back with his shot gun it was over. DEC did nothing as did troopers. It was reported to the correct authorities but they said without evidence of the actual dogs killing the other dog nothing they could do. Now as for the author killing dogs like he says he had there are other means to discourage a canine. Neighbors must be missing a lot of there pets though.

Me I love dogs and have had a pitbull since 81. Wouldn't be without one just cause to me they are the best friend a man can have. Any dog for that matter save for curr dogs. I have only ever been in contact with 2 PB's that I would have dropped if I didn't know the owners well. One my brother in law kept for his son that was just viscous unless you were my brother in law or his son. The other was owned by the kennel owner of the breeder of my first PB I owned, my Mr. Wilson. Mr. Wilson's stud was a doggo by the moniker of Rebel and it was about as unpredictable as any dog I've ever come across. But the breeder and I rode together so as long as I was with him it was cool. stay safe
 
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