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The Members Discussion Thread

Discussion in 'Axe, Tomahawk, & Hatchet Forum' started by KiwiBloke, Feb 21, 2019.

  1. Agent_H

    Agent_H Gold Member Gold Member

    Aug 21, 2013
    [​IMG]

    ;)
     
  2. Square_peg

    Square_peg Gold Member Gold Member

    Feb 1, 2012
    I have my grandson's first 2 hatchets set aside for him. He just turned 5. I'm waiting another year or 2 before he gets the mini.
     
  3. junkenstien

    junkenstien

    780
    Feb 15, 2017
    Didn’t want to jack up the hang thread.Suppose it is pretty acute,seems to work ok it’s at least two pounds maybe more.The serrated one is how most of the ones I find look like.
    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
  4. Square_peg

    Square_peg Gold Member Gold Member

    Feb 1, 2012
    Wow! Looks like someone put a serrated edge on it. You were wise to file that off.
     
  5. Fmont

    Fmont Gold Member Gold Member

    853
    Apr 20, 2017
    I'm on the mobile so I can't see where junkenstein is at. But if he sees a lot of them like that, I wonder why they were doing them up like that. Like, what types of lumber were people using that they would do that? If this was a way that people did things for a legitimate reason I'd like to know why!! Seems like maybe for stringy grain or something?
     
  6. crbnSteeladdict

    crbnSteeladdict

    651
    Jul 31, 2017
    Thanks. I have never seen before a hatchet with serrated edge. It reminds me of a conversation with first generation Italian guy who had high regards for serrated sickles (Seen few sickles in my life but non of them had any notches on the blade).
     
    Last edited: Jun 27, 2019
  7. jake pogg

    jake pogg

    Dec 20, 2015
    A conveniently-general thread,cool...Just wanted to let everyone know that our combined effort put into research on 18th c. American axes weren't wasted,and shall resume in a couple more months.
    Driftwood season is safely behind us now,and i'm in the midst of king salmon fishing.
    The Yukon runs of this magnificent creature has been faltering,and is not doing all that hot this year so far(that's how i had an odd moment or two to check in here).
    Last year a Brit reality show hosted by Jeremy Wade did an episode on the subject:.
    I'm in it.I really liked Jeremy,he has a biology degree,and was asking all sorts of incisive,pertinent questions,but this is how he makes his living,and as a result it's a Discovery Channel tripe,in essence,and is mostly worth it for the sake of pretty photography,and Very general information.
    All the discussion that we held with Jeremy did not make the cut(the film crew coordinator kept reminding him to keep to the script:),and fortunately all of my b.s. got cut out with it,so im only moderately embarrassed by this exposure.
    The king salmon is Not extinct,here's a photo from the day before yesterday,my fishing partner Nolan Aloisius and i out on a 24-hour opening:https://imgur.com/FkcKIXi

    In a way i almost no longer want to be harvesting these poor struggling beasts,but can't bring myself to quit,and it is my livelyhood,and the Native American culture within which i live and operate in accordance with holds it that as long as we catch these the world Will continue to keep going around...(in ancient tradition the yearly cycle begins when the first king is caught,it is the proof of God's love and benevolence for us humans).

    There'll still be a Summer,and then the Fall runs of chum salmon that i will work at,but eventually it Will be falltime,and i'll get back to forging,and maybe we'll see some results,finally...
     
  8. Fmont

    Fmont Gold Member Gold Member

    853
    Apr 20, 2017
    That's really cool, Jake! If I had the gumption I'd pick up and try to live as you do. Alas, I lack the wherewithall to take a run at it. I'll be 40 in October, so the learning curve may be a bit much to weather. And I'd sure be in a pickle if I couldn't make a go of it, as I understand is the case with many!

    I'm only mildly familiar with the issue addressed in this episode. I have two close friends who are fisheries biologists living in Oregon. I'll make a point to talk to them, it's certainly piqued my interest.

    I have worked with MDEQ and our DNR doing water quality checks in MI as an aquatic entomologist (I'm also a biologist, wildlife and entomology). The method I use(d) utilized samples of macroinvertebrates. The information gleaned would give us a biotic index. For my part, the insects, the three that influence (and actually are used solely in a simpler biotic index) most heavily are caddisflies, stoneflies, and mayflies. In moving water the presence of stoneflies is usually a good sign, they require high amounts of dissolved oxygen. If you have moving water (lotic) and are only finding true flies, on the other hand, something is probably wrong.

    My aquatic entomology mentor and his colleagues actually spent a good deal of time in Alaska. These 3 fine men literally wrote the book on aquatic entomology. I recall his favorite midge occurring in Alaska, blepharicerids, generally found at the foot of waterfalls. I'm curious enough to reach out to some people and see what the latest theories are.
     
  9. Square_peg

    Square_peg Gold Member Gold Member

    Feb 1, 2012
    Thank you for caring about salmon, Jake. I care, too.

    I'm the Vice Chair of the council that oversees our local salmon river. Our king salmon are listed as 'threatened' under the ESA. We're making great efforts to keep the run alive. Our sockey run is on a course to go extinct in 20 years. Lots of factors are involved. Off channel habitat for both spawning and rearing is one. Climate change it is a biggy. River temperatures are extremely high near the estuary when the fish are coming in. Predation by both native and invasive species of fish plays a role.

    But I think the biggest problem is fish piracy - the taking of salmon on the high seas. You see, there's no reason to fish for salmon on the high seas. They are all coming back to their local rivers where they can be caught without the extra effort. The only reason to catch them at sea is to take them from someone else's river. North American and Asian fishing fleets both steal fish at sea, some legally, some illegally. But it makes no difference. The fish are disappearing.

    I remember as a boy seeing my local river turn red from the backs of all the king salmon in summer. Not anymore. :(
     
  10. KiwiBloke

    KiwiBloke

    389
    Oct 2, 2018
    Another Gordon Ramsey axe video! Still waiting for him to release pictures of his collection :p

    Start at 3:05

     
    Fmont likes this.
  11. ithinkverydeeply

    ithinkverydeeply Gold Member Gold Member

    980
    Dec 17, 2018
    Ahhh man. He didn’t chop at all!
     
    Fmont likes this.
  12. ScottB65

    ScottB65

    127
    Jul 5, 2019

    I hear you, to a point. I'm one that still likes Pink salmon, but only when they are as bright as silver dollar and they aren't that way in any river I've ever fished. Some with lots of other salmon. Hard to dislike a winter king.
     
    Square_peg and ithinkverydeeply like this.
  13. Square_peg

    Square_peg Gold Member Gold Member

    Feb 1, 2012
    I've caught sockeye 200 river miles from the ocean that were still perfect.
     
  14. ScottB65

    ScottB65

    127
    Jul 5, 2019
    I defy you to find a pink 200 miles from salt that's worth a hoot. Different water systems are, in a word, different.

    That said, I always thought if someone wanted to eat 'wild' salmon, then they should grab a rod and reel and get after it.

    This is a Sockeye caught about 1/2 mile from salt

    [​IMG]
     
    ithinkverydeeply likes this.
  15. jake pogg

    jake pogg

    Dec 20, 2015
    Very much so,Scott.I fish 600 miles from salt,and catch many a king,chum,and coho in that beautiful silver-dollar stage.
    The deterioration is timed to set in relative to the fish's closeness to the spawning grounds.
    How or why,even the superlative user-fees based conservation system practiced in the US cannot tell us yet...

    I regret being so short on time this time of year,lots of wonderful comments here i cannot respond to...:(
    Special thanks to Fmont for those cool notes on aquatic entomology,i now think about it as i'm seeing different insects in and around my boat and processing area...Would love to have you come visit and talk about it in some detail...:)
     
    Fmont likes this.
  16. ScottB65

    ScottB65

    127
    Jul 5, 2019

    Exactly.

    Provincialism is common among most folks. Just because a fish is silver dollar bright 150 miles from salt in water system A does not correlate to water system B. Most of my time spent fishing in Alaska was SE. Lots of short streams. I've caught plenty of almost all black kings that hadn't made it the stream yet.
     
  17. Square_peg

    Square_peg Gold Member Gold Member

    Feb 1, 2012
    A pink is a different animal. They don't store as much fat as a sockeye or king. We call them humpies. I'm selective of my humpies even 20 miles up stream. I've found the smaller hens have the best color.
     
    Trailsawyer and Fmont like this.
  18. Fmont

    Fmont Gold Member Gold Member

    853
    Apr 20, 2017
    Learning entomology changed my worldview completely, far more so than any other organismal biology. It's the majority of life in Earth, but completely alien to the majority of people on Earth. If I get the chance I'll come up and we'll sample! Maybe you could show me something about living in the Alaskan way.
     
  19. Agent_H

    Agent_H Gold Member Gold Member

    Aug 21, 2013
    Road trip to Galena needs to be made.
    Is it true that local customs require guests to bring host offerings of fine steel and spirits?*
    [​IMG]
    *Thinks it’s Friday...
     
    garry3, Fmont, Trailsawyer and 3 others like this.
  20. ithinkverydeeply

    ithinkverydeeply Gold Member Gold Member

    980
    Dec 17, 2018
    I need to follow the “vices” thread closer! :cool:
    [​IMG]
     
    garry3, Fmont, junkenstien and 4 others like this.

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